FROM THE BLOG

Ask Deborah: Should I Convert my IRA to a Roth IRA?

Creating a retirement strategy is an important factor in planning for your ideal financial future. Whether you’re at the first steps and are trying to identify your options or are up for a review of existing accounts, you have plenty of decisions to make.

Today we’re talking to our very own Deborah Williams, CFP to learn more about a popular retirement topic: should I convert my IRA to a Roth IRA? She’ll answer some questions you may have about who is a suitable candidate for a conversion and what benefits such a decision allows.

If you have retirement accounts and are considering an IRA conversion, grab a cup of coffee and stay a couple of minutes as we explore the details of this option for your retirement strategy!

Identifying A Suitable Candidate for a Roth IRA Conversion

Before you determine whether to make the switch from an IRA to a Roth IRA, you want to identify whether this is an appropriate move for you as an individual. While everyone is unique and your retirement needs may likely differ from those of your neighbors or coworkers, there are some general categories of investors for whom an IRA conversion makes sense.

Younger investors, for example, can generally benefit from a conversion to Roth IRA, since they have the time to let the investment account compound and grow. If you’re not going to be dipping into your retirement funds for a few decades yet, you may want to consider making the switch.

Since Roth IRA accounts offer tax savings on distributions and withdrawals, it may be beneficial for those who are in a lower tax bracket currently and anticipate that they will be in a higher tax bracket during retirement to make a conversion. This way, they will pay less tax on the conversion due to their current bracket but enjoy the break later on when they are taking distributions and are in a higher bracket.

Roth IRAs can also be a strategy for investors who are approaching retirement age and want to avoid having to take their required minimum distribution that is mandated at age 70 1/2. In fact, if you plan to sit on your IRA funds and prefer not to use them extensively during your retirement, these accounts are ideal for passing onto your heirs tax-free.

Tax Considerations of Converting to a Roth IRA

For many, the switch from a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA is motivated by the tax benefits of making such a move. Unlike the IRA there is no tax credit for contributions to a Roth and the value of the account at the time of conversion to a Roth would be added to taxable income for that year. So if your IRA is down in value due to a market loss it may be a good time to consider converting. But if you aren’t able or willing to make the federal and state tax payments that will be attributed to the switch then conversion will not be right for you.

Roth IRA conversions can also offer very specific tax benefits for business owners who are recording a net-operating business loss. Under certain situations, they can use the value of their loss to offset the additional taxable income created by the Roth IRA conversion. With proper planning and consultation with the CPA even an unfortunate business loss may benefit the owner’s long term retirement plan. Traditional IRA account owners should consider the tax ramifications, age and income restrictions in regards to executing a conversion from a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. The converted amount is generally subject to income taxation.

Your Retirement Savings Options

Deciding whether to convert to a Roth IRA is a personal decision that requires careful consideration. If you’d like to learn more about your IRA options or start planning for your retirement, feel free to contact Deborah at Puckett & Sturgill Financial Group for a discovery meeting.

The Roth IRA offers tax deferral on any earnings in the account. Withdrawals from the account may be tax free, as long as they are considered qualified. Limitations and restrictions may apply. Withdrawals prior to age 59 ½ or prior to the account being opened for 5 years, whichever is later, may result in a 10% IRS penalty tax. Future tax laws can change at any time and may impact the benefits of Roth IRAs. Their tax treatment may change.